London Terrace: Truth in advertising?

Can you really sit on the roof of Chelsea’s London Terrace and wave to passing ships? I doubt it, but this 1936 ad sure demonstrates otherwise. I bet it is nice and cool up there.

Occupying Ninth to Tenth Avenues along 23rd to 24th Streets, London Terrace—a series of connected apartment buildings based around a central garden—was built in 1930, taking the place of an older London Terrace designed in 1845. Those Greek Revival townhouses were dubbed “Millionaires’ Row.”

Fun fact: When the second London Terrace opened, they had doormen dressed as English bobbies manning the front desks.

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6 Responses to “London Terrace: Truth in advertising?”

  1. ibrahim binshahbal Says:

    nice article.

  2. Tyler Hill Says:

    As a London Terrace resident I would like to point out that the sun deck is still available. It is open with deckchairs, a shower, greenery and a commanding view of Hudson though I believe you would look pretty stupid waving at the ships.

    The doorman still dress as modern day “bobbies” with the concierge decked out in the old domed helmet.

    The pool is so beautifully retro ’20s (muted mosaics, cane furniture and wooden lockers) it often does double duty as a movie and television set.

    It was built on the eve of the great depression and the first owner met his fate by jumping off one the towers.

    The rents are very current.

  3. angela Says:

    This complex is a bloated and arrogant poor sister of something grand. The on- going restoration of the facade is extremely poor managed, rendering half of the roof deck unusable for the entire summer and the occupancy of the apartments untenable for half of this year. Do not be fooled by the hype!

  4. The majestic old pool at Chelsea’s London Terrace « Ephemeral New York Says:

    [...] the London Terrace went up in 1930, its developer claimed it to be the biggest apartment complex in the [...]

  5. The majestic pool at Chelsea’s London Terrace « Ephemeral New York Says:

    [...] the London Terrace went up in 1930, its developer claimed it to be the biggest apartment complex in the [...]

  6. A long-gone Chelsea alley called Franklin Terrace | Ephemeral New York Says:

    […] nowhere near Franklin Street in Tribeca. And it doesn’t seem related to nearby London Terrace, developed in 1845 as a residential stretch on Ninth Avenue at 23rd Street and now the name of the famous apartment […]

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