Archive for the ‘Bizarre deli names’ Category

Gorgeous neon signs illuminating the city

March 3, 2014

What’s more beautiful than block after block of glowing reds and blues and pinks and yellows, emanating light and heat?

Oldhomesteadsign

These food-oriented neon signs also make you hungry. The Old Homestead sign looks pretty old, though not as old as this steak house (two words!) itself, from 1868.

Donutpub14thstreet

The Donut Pub on 14th Street, a 50-year-old remnant of New York before cronuts and Starbucks, recently survived a competitive attack by an upstart Dunkin’ Donuts down the block, which quietly closed shop a few years ago.

DeRobertispastryshoppe

DeRobertis Caffe and Pasticceria has been baking sweets for 110 years on First Avenue near 14th Street, when this was an Sicilian immigrant micro-neighborhood featuring Russo Brothers, Veniero, and probably hundreds of small shops lost to history.

Queensign

Queen is an oddly named Italian restaurant (since 1958!) on Court Street in Brooklyn. You have to dig that crown.

Katzsign

And of course, Katz’s Deli, a treasure of New York neon and store signage—and sandwiches and Jewish soul food too.

More sublime neon beauty can be found here.

Manhattan store signs that explode with color

September 12, 2013

Blue, green, red, yellow, pink—a walk down an old-school city street bathes you in bursting color and light. It makes New York feel magical.

Venierossign

Just looking at the Veniero’s Pasticceria sign (119 years on East 11th Street!) kicks in a cannoli craving.

Pasticceria is a beautiful, lyrical word, no?

Russanddaughterssign

Russ & Daughters Appetizers, on East Houston, is a feast for the eyes inside as well.

This slightly derelict clothing-store sign on Orchard Street doesn’t pop with color, but the light blue and red on the left are the kinds of 1960s kitschy hues you rarely see anymore.

Highstyleshirtsign

The High Style Shirt Company is long-gone; an art gallery moved into the space and uncovered the vintage signage. Luckily they kept it up!

Cloverdelicatessensign

The Clover Delicatessen glows in emerald and pink on Second Avenue at 34th Street. It’s been around since the 1940s.

What remains of vintage city store signs

April 16, 2012

They’ve mostly been painted over or blocked out of sight by newer, flashier signs. But these artifacts from an older New York refuse to be silenced.

On Broadway and 181st Street is a big corner bodega called Smile Deli. But lurking underneath the green awning is the 1970s-esque 181st Street Food Market sign, with its old-school 7-Up logo.

I have no idea how far back this sign for a Hebrew bookstore goes. It looks like the place, on Ludlow Street, was abandoned, the sign left to deteriorate.

The Hello Deli on West 53rd Street, made famous by David Letterman who tapes his show around the corner, had a previous incarnation as the Preview Sandwich Shop. I love the 1960s typeface.

Above the sign for Bite, at 211 East 14th Street, is the faded lettering for what looks like a locksmith or hardware store. “We make keys names plates and mail boxes” it tells us. But there’s no name or other clue to its history.

Vintage Coca-Cola signage on faded storefronts

April 7, 2011

Are these real Coca-Cola store signs—or just temporary props put up for a film shoot?

I might say the latter if I didn’t see them myself. There aren’t many delis, drugstores, and luncheonettes left in New York featuring the familiar red and white Coke logo.

Spotting one is like a trip back in time. The Starlite Deli fluorescent sign continues to light up West 44th Street in Times Square.

A handmade sign advertising Coke and 7-Up, now that’s a rare find. This one is on Carmine Street.

This corner shop in Astoria apparently still stocks 20th century artifacts such as school supplies, cigars, and “pocketbooks.” It’s under the N train elevated tracks.

Some cool vintage pizza and Italian food signs

January 5, 2011

There’s something so wonderful about seeing the word “Ravioli” in giant red letters, as it appears in this technicolor sign in Gravesend.

In the shadow of midtown skyscrapers, this vintage sign for the bland-sounding Park Italian Deli, on 45th Street, still hangs on.

The Espresso Pizza sign, in Bay Ridge, looks like it dates from the Tony Manero era.

I like the ZZ’s in Inwood’s Pizza Haven signage.

“New York Deli” must have already been taken

April 20, 2009

So why not turn to other state names when it comes to naming your deli/grocery/bodega? Kentucky isn’t all that far from New York. Or perhaps the owners of this Avenue D establishment were trying to make a point about how much distance lies between their store and the center of Manhattan.

kentuckydeligrocery

Calling your shop the Alaska Food Market at least implies that the beer and soda will always be ice-cold. It’s in Chelsea on lower Ninth Avenue.

alaskafoodmarket

Three ways to say Deli in New York

December 11, 2008

Delicatessen signs are all over the city, some more distinctive that others. This mosiac storefront in Greenpoint has a medieval kind of touch:

delisignmedieval

I don’t know how long this vertical sign has been affixed to this Jane Street building, but the store below it hasn’t been a deli for years.

delisignvertical

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Harlem neighborhood deli sign that has seen better days. Why Golden Gate?

delisignharlem

More old Brooklyn phone exchanges

September 19, 2008

Joe’s Superette on Smith Street in Carroll Gardens has the most wonderful store sign, which looks like it was put up around 1958. UL stood for Ulster. But what was Ulster?

The Valencia Bakery is on Broadway in Williamsburg. Besides a cool old 1960s sign, the WY exchange remains.

“God Bless Deli Grocery”

July 27, 2008

There are more of these circa-9/11 delis and pizza places than I ever thought. Perhaps the owners truly got caught up in the sentiment of the time, or maybe they just wanted to make sure no one accused them of being Muslim terrorists.

The God Bless Deli is on Manhattan Avenue in Greenpoint.

The joke is on you at the Ha Ha Deli

July 23, 2008

It’s a funny little place to pick up groceries, cat food, and flowers on Ninth Avenue in Chelsea. And fresh too!


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,715 other followers