The six towns of Brooklyn

It’s neat to think that Brooklyn was originally made up of six separate towns, five of them Dutch, which then united into the city of Brooklyn and eventually morphed into Kings County as we know it. This map, date unknown, also includes the names of small villages within those early towns—like New Lots, Bedford, and Williamsburgh. 

The map notes Bergen and Mill Islands, site of present-day Bergen Beach and Mill Basin. And Coney Island is two actual islands here.

 

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5 Responses to “The six towns of Brooklyn”

  1. Joe F Says:

    reading this I’m reminded of a great book. “the Island at the Center of the World” If you haven’t read it, you should, you’ll love it.

    JFF

  2. Adam J Schwartz Says:

    That Brooklyn Map is from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle 1946 series on 300 years of Brooklyn. You can find a scan of the original here: http://www.bklyn-genealogy-info.com/Town/Bushwick/index.html

  3. A river of cars runs through it | The Weekly Nabe Says:

    […] Living in Windsor Terrace had many perks. It was located at the extreme northwest of the town of Flatbush, just over the border from the city of Brooklyn. Residents could enjoy the convenience of the growing city while remaining “free from the city taxes and assessments”. It was adjacent to Green-Wood Cemetery, a very popular destination for tourism, picnicking, and leisure. Its position on a hill (which might have inspired the “Terrace” part of its name) offered views of Brooklyn, Manhattan, the Rockaways, and the Atlantic Ocean. And in the early 1860s, Prospect Park was proposed. Map of the original six towns of Kings County. (From Ephemeral New York) […]

  4. Skin the City | The Nature of Cities Says:

    […] direction, three distinct street grids turn away from each other, relics of the independence of the six towns that became Kings County in New York State and then the City of Brooklyn, which later became one of […]

  5. Skin the City – Arts Everywhere Says:

    […] three distinct street grids turn away from each other, relics of the independence of the six towns that became Kings County in New York State and then the City of Brooklyn, which later became one […]

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