Weehawken Street’s sloped-roof house

Rarely do you view a 130-year-old image of a city house and realize that the same house looks identical today. But that’s the case with 392 West Street, aka 6 Weehawken Street, in the West Village. This engraving, probably from Harper’s New Monthly Magazine in the 1870s, depicts the wood-frame home at that address.

 

Here’s 6 Weekhawken today. The staircase ends differently, a tree provides some shade, and a small window near the door has been walled up. But everything else seems to match.

The little house has a colorful history. It was built in 1834 as the Weehawken Market on land that had been part of Newgate State Prison, a colonial jail at 10th Street and the Hudson River which shut down that same year. 

But the market failed, and in 1848 the house was bought by a boat builder, then traded hands again and used as a saloon, gambling den, clam house, and pool hall. In the 1970s to 1990s, it housed gay bars. The building doesn’t seem to have any commercial use now. 

Weehawken Street, the centerpiece of the tiny Weehawken Street Historic District, is the smallest street in Manhattan—and one that people love to piss on, as this old sign makes clear. 

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6 Responses to “Weehawken Street’s sloped-roof house”

  1. Please do not urinate on Weehawken Street « Ephemeral New York Says:

    […] For more on the history of this interesting little block, check out this earlier post. […]

  2. Kithcen Design Says:

    I just came back from Weehawken Street, this house is still standing and looks great! Hats off to the people who are up keeping this beautiful landmark!

  3. Tours on foursquare…enormously gratifying. Where now? – RobKelley RobKelley! Says:

    […] in lower Manhattan”, according to the Village preservation group.  Ephemeral New York has a great post with a period […]

  4. Rob Kelley Says:

    This is a great post. I referred to it on http://robkelley.net/blog/?p=57

  5. Celia Wells Says:

    I lived in that house with my husband and daughter from 1962 to 1970. It was charming, with 2 bedrooms and an attic which served as my husband’s studio. An academic job took me and our daughter, and he moved to a loft in Chelsea. But I will never forget this landmark in my life. Thank you. Celia Wells (Willen)

  6. Celia Wells Says:

    I lived in that house with my husband and daughter from 1962 to 1970. It was charming, with 2 bedrooms and an attic which served as my husband’s studio. An academic job took me and our daughter to Connecticut and he moved to a loft in Chelsea. But I will never forget this landmark in my life. Thank you. Celia Wells (Willen)

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