Arion Place’s musical mansion

Now known as the Opera House Lofts (and located in East Williamsburg, at least on paper), this stately building’s original name was Arion Hall, the headquarters for the Arion Singing Society, a German men’s choral group (or “Mannerchor”) whose musical selections catered to a working-class audience in Bushwick.

Some of the decorative elements on the fire escapes and roof (below) make it clear that this 1886 structure, on Arion Place (formerly called Wall Street) and Broadway, was all about music.

 

In the 19th and early 20th centuries, when Bushwick was a predominantly German neighborhood, the Arion Singing Society regularly performed for local crowds. Apparently they were very well-received, as this Brooklyn Daily Eagle blurb notes. 

Tags: , , ,

5 Responses to “Arion Place’s musical mansion”

  1. BushwickBK.com » Blog Archive » Bushwick Clicks 7/14/08 Says:

    […] Mansion: A nice little bit on the history of the Opera House Lofts on Arion […]

  2. When Brooklyn dedicated its German Hospital « Ephemeral New York Says:

    […] Germans for several years,” stated a  celebratory New York Times article. “The various German clubs and singing societies throughout the city interested themselves in the matter, and finally enough money was […]

  3. Mike Says:

    Any original photos existing in Brooklyn Historical Society? etc?

  4. Skin the City | The Nature of Cities Says:

    […] The Church was designed by Cooper Union-educated architect Theobald Engelhardt a generation after the village of Bushwick was incorporated into the new City (!) of Brooklyn. Mr. Engelhardt located his own architecture office around the corner from the Church site on Broadway while the spire went up. It was in a building he also designed on what was then Brooklyn’s Wall Street, across the street from a German singing society hall the construction of which was paid for by its members, and which he also designed. […]

  5. Skin the City – Arts Everywhere Says:

    […] The Church was designed by Cooper Union-educated architect Theobald Engelhardt a generation after the village of Bushwick was incorporated into the new City (!) of Brooklyn. Mr. Engelhardt located his own architecture office around the corner from the Church site on Broadway while the spire went up. It was in a building he also designed on what was then Brooklyn’s Wall Street, across the street from a German singing society hall the construction of which was paid for by its members, and which he also designed. […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.


%d bloggers like this: