One of the first Italian restaurants in the Village

Italian restaurants have been thriving for so long in New York City, it seems strange to imagine a time when there were none.

That was just before Enrico & Paglieri opened on West 11th Street off Sixth Avenue.

“Countless people’s first Italian table d’hote meal was had here at this proudly immaculate place which, going and growing since 1908, now takes the underparts of three brownstone houses,” states 1948 restaurant guide Knife and Fork in New York.

“A la carte scope is broad and luxurious, taking in all the traditions and offering many specialties of the house, such as pate de foie gras, made on the premises, containing sherry and brandy, straciatella soup, (chicken stock, yolk of eggs, rice), risotto Piemontese (fried in broth with chopped squash, green peas, truffles).”

Enrico & Paglieri closed up shop sometime in the 1970s. Can you still get a full Italian Sunday dinner at a restaurant in New York City at 1 p.m., as listed in the guidebook?

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4 Responses to “One of the first Italian restaurants in the Village”

  1. Amy Says:

    Holy cow. I went to this restaurant with ex-husband on our second date back in 1971. I do miss it. But I had no idea it was so historic.

  2. WHAMMO! Says:

    Two phone numbers?

  3. RD Wolff Says:

    My cousin and his family owned Bertolotti’s restaurant in the Village, it was in the Edgar Allen Poe building that NYU thoughtfully destroyed a few years ago…

  4. A last sign of a defunct Italian restaurant in SoHo | Ephemeral New York Says:

    […] was before SoHo was a luxury loft district, when the area was an Italian working class enclave of spaghetti houses and groceries bordering Greenwich […]

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