“Under Brooklyn Bridge” in 1931

This drypoint etching by William C. McNulty—described as a “romantic-realist” in a 1963 obituary in The New York Times—depicts an industrial city under stormy skies.

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6 Responses to ““Under Brooklyn Bridge” in 1931”

  1. Paul Says:

    He is described as a “romantic realist”? Romantic yes, but realist? If one is looking at the Brooklyn Bridge from the Brooklyn side one would not see what looks like the Empire State Building to the left. This could be, if anything, any bridge in the United States that crosses over to a major city. An amusing example of artistic license.

  2. wildnewyork Says:

    Rearranging the skyline–I like his boldness.

  3. Joe R Says:

    I think that building is supposed to be 70 Pine Street, currently the tallest building downtown.

  4. It’s Friday-Time to Catch Up on Social History! | Now and Then: an American Social History Project blog Says:

    […] New York featured a great etching by William C. McNulty done in 1931 depicting a bustling industrial New York viewed from under the Brooklyn Bridge.  Its […]

  5. Dalton McNulty Says:

    It’s always “fun” to see old etchings of Bill’s (my grandfather’s brother) resurfacing. He was a great artist and from all family accounts, a fun man to be around.

    • David Sykes Says:

      My mom has a McNulty original etching in her house in Maine. Apparently, according to my dad (RIP) William C McNulty was a client of my grandfather ( Robert J, Sykes – lawyer in New York) and paid for legal work with the etching. I admire the work whenever visiting mom.

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