1930s posters pleading for “planned housing”

Disease, fire, crime, infant mortality—could better housing conditions make a dent in these social and environmental problems plaguing Depression-era New York City?


Fiorello La Guardia thought so. After taking office in 1934, Mayor La Guardia made what was gently called “slum clearance” a priority and argued that the “submerged middle class” needed better housing.


Tear down the old, build up the new!” he thundered on his WNYC radio show. “Down with rotten antiquated rat holes. Down with hovels, down with disease, down with firetraps, let in the sun, let in the sky, a new day is dawning, a new life, a new America.”


La Guardia wasn’t necessarily being melodramatic. Much of the housing stock for poor and working class residents in New York consisted of tenements that were shoddily built to accommodate thousands of newcomers in the second half of the 19th century.


By the 1930s, many tenements were falling apart. And it’s safe to assume that not all of them adhered to the requirements of the Tenement Act of 1901, which mandated adequate ventilation and a bathroom in every apartment.


To help make his case for housing improvement, La Guardia created the Mayor’s Poster Project, part of the Civil Works Administration (and later under the thumb of the WPA’s Federal Art Project).

LaguardiaradioArtists designed and produced posters that advocated for better housing—as well as other health and social issues, from eating right to getting checked for syphilis.

La Guardia achieved his goals. Under his administration, the first city public housing development, simply named the First Houses, began accepting families in today’s East Village in 1935.

The mayor—and his posters—set the stage for the boom in public housing that accelerated after World War II. Whether these developments helped ease the city’s social ills is still a contentious topic.

The Library of Congress has a worth-checking-out collection of hundreds of WPA posters from around the nation.

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4 Responses to “1930s posters pleading for “planned housing””

  1. Phyllis Says:

    I think some of these tenements survived quite a bit longer though. Chris Stein (guitartist for Blondie) last week posted on Facebook a photo of his 1971 kitchen on First & 1st. The clearance from the sink to the wall is barely 24 inches – just enough room to store his bicycle.

  2. ephemeralnewyork Says:

    Right, they certainly didn’t bulldoze them all. I think they concentrated on the worst of the worst downtown and in the Lower East Side. I live in one, and I know others who do too. Interior windows!

  3. Deborah Molloy Says:

    This is fascinating. There’s lots to be found about the mercantile growth of the city, but not so much on social housing.

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