The street names carved into Brooklyn corners

Look up at this busy Park Slope corner, and you’ll see two street names engraved on decorative blocks: 5th Avenue (the numeral, lovely!) and Garfield Place.

The lettering is in remarkably good condition, considering that it could be 134 years old.

In 1883, two years after the assassination of President Garfield, Garfield Place became the new name of what used to be Macomb Street. (Though the Macomb name lives on engraved into another corner.)

Third Avenue and Dean Street both still exist, of course. But it’s unusual to see street names carved into marble, which decorates the facade of a New York Times‘ 20th century printing plant on this Boerum Hill corner.

The former printing plant now houses a school, which features these wonderful original Art Deco bas reliefs.

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9 Responses to “The street names carved into Brooklyn corners”

  1. Zoe Says:

    I love these. I don’t remember ever noticing them until you pointed them out.

  2. trilby1895 Says:

    These are lovely reminders for me of the street signage in London – street “place” names displayed on corners of buildings.

  3. krishnakumarsinghblog Says:

    good

  4. Ty Says:

    These chiseled signs also reflect how our worldview has rotated 180 degrees from the belief that what we do matters and will last.

  5. Lady G. Says:

    Those are beautiful. When I see little embellishments like that I feel transported to the past.

  6. Lady G. Says:

    Reblogged this on The Realm Of Olde Brooklyn and commented:
    These carved names are remarkable. I wonder how many other pre-war buildings have carvings in Brooklyn? If you peruse her blog -Ephemeral New York has found plenty of these lovelies all around Manhattan.

  7. The relics on tenements at a Lenox Hill corner | Ephemeral New York Says:

    […] them can be found in Manhattan and Brooklyn—especially in older neighborhoods like Williamsburg, downtown Brooklyn, the East Village, and the Lower East […]

  8. The relics on tenements at a Lenox Hill corner | News for New Yorkers Says:

    […] them can be found in Manhattan and Brooklyn—especially in older neighborhoods like Williamsburg, downtown Brooklyn, the East Village, and the Lower East […]

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