A crowded workday street scene in the 1950 city

Benjamin Eistenstat was born in Philadelphia in 1915, and the few biographies I found about him suggest that he spent much of his artistic career in Pennsylvania.

But in 1950 he was in New York City—where he created this lithograph of a street scene in a very masculine Manhattan. Perhaps this view is of a truncated Grand Central Terminal/42nd Street and Park Avenue Viaduct?

See the image closeup here; with such rich details, it’s easy to get lost in it.

[1stdibs.com]

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6 Responses to “A crowded workday street scene in the 1950 city”

  1. Bob Says:

    This definitely depicts the “Grand Central Terminal/42nd Street and Park Avenue Viaduct” as you note. The two wings of the Commodore Hotel and the base of the Chrysler building are visible in the background. Compare to: https://digitalcollections.nypl.org/items/510d47e1-ffaf-a3d9-e040-e00a18064a99

  2. George Morgenweck Says:

    I have a wealth of info on the REAL Hell’s Kitchen. I lived right in the middle of Hell’s Kitchen from 1935 to 1950. I have stories that would fill several books.

  3. George Morgenweck Says:

    I lived in the middle of hell’s kitchen from 1935-1950. I would go to Grand Central, Post Office, Port Authority, and Penn Station and sell papers. I have stories that would fill several books.

  4. George Morgenweck Says:

    I lived in the middle of hell’s kitchen from 1935-1950. I sold newspapers in Grand Central, Port Authority, Post Office and Penn Station, I have stories that would fill several books.

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