Ephemeral New York explores the servants of the Gilded Age in a new podcast

Gilded Age new rich and old money families had one thing in common: they all employed an army of servants to clean their mansions, mind their children, prepare their meals, drive their carriages, and take care of any other task members of elite society deemed necessary. But who were these butlers, chambermaids, laundresses, cooks, valets, and coachmen—and what was life like for them?

In a new episode of the history podcast The Gilded Gentleman, host Carl Raymond (writer, editor, and social and cultural historian) has invited me to take a look at the roles and responsibilities of domestic staff in grand mansions and more modest homes. We’ll explore what servants did—and who they really were. The episode pays tribute to the “invisible magicians” without whom the dinners, balls, and daily workings of households of the Gilded Age would never have been possible. 

The episode debuts on Tuesday, February 22. You can download it and subscribe to The Gilded Gentleman on Apple or your favorite podcast player. The Gilded Gentleman podcast is produced by The Bowery Boys.

[Photo: MCNY 1900, MNY204627]

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3 Responses to “Ephemeral New York explores the servants of the Gilded Age in a new podcast”

  1. Ephemeral New York explores the servants of the Gilded Age in a new podcast – Urban Fishing Pole Lifestyle Says:

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  2. Ephemeral New York explores the servants of the Gilded Age in a new podcast - The New York Beacon Says:

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  3. Ephemeral New York explores the servants of the Gilded Age in a new podcast – The Philadelphia Observer Says:

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