Archive for the ‘Random signage’ Category

1970s city store signs that burst with color

March 24, 2014

Treat yourself to a Monday morning explosion of old-school color—courtesy of these New York store signs that give off a very 1970s vibe.

Acepumpsign

Ace Pump got its start in 1936, and still deals in engineering supplies on superluxe 21st Street in Chelsea.

20thcenturygaragesign

I’ve always loved the 20th Century Garage sign, as well as its name, which must have sounded very modern at one time. It’s near Tudor City on East 48th Street. It looks like it was made before the 1970s, no?

Jeromefloristsign

Jerome Florist, on 96th Street and Madison Avenue, has been selling arrangements to Upper East Siders (and the area’s abundance of hospitals) since 1929.

Capitalelectronicssign

Once known as Capital Audio & Electronics, this Duane Street shop took the electronics out of its name, perhaps to sound less 1970s-ish.

Vernonavepharmacysign

Pharmacy signs like this one in Queens—no-frills, no brand names, with a neighborhood vibe—have mostly disappeared from city streets.

Gorgeous neon signs illuminating the city

March 3, 2014

What’s more beautiful than block after block of glowing reds and blues and pinks and yellows, emanating light and heat?

Oldhomesteadsign

These food-oriented neon signs also make you hungry. The Old Homestead sign looks pretty old, though not as old as this steak house (two words!) itself, from 1868.

Donutpub14thstreet

The Donut Pub on 14th Street, a 50-year-old remnant of New York before cronuts and Starbucks, recently survived a competitive attack by an upstart Dunkin’ Donuts down the block, which quietly closed shop a few years ago.

DeRobertispastryshoppe

DeRobertis Caffe and Pasticceria has been baking sweets for 110 years on First Avenue near 14th Street, when this was an Sicilian immigrant micro-neighborhood featuring Russo Brothers, Veniero, and probably hundreds of small shops lost to history.

Queensign

Queen is an oddly named Italian restaurant (since 1958!) on Court Street in Brooklyn. You have to dig that crown.

Katzsign

And of course, Katz’s Deli, a treasure of New York neon and store signage—and sandwiches and Jewish soul food too.

More sublime neon beauty can be found here.

A short history of tipping waiters in New York

February 24, 2014

Any current city guidebook gives the same advice: the proper tip to a server in New York stands at 20 percent of the total bill. It wasn’t always so.

Delmonicosadmiraldewey1906

“The waiter who hands you the check . . . should get 15 per cent (as should a waitress in a tearoom); in a night club, 20 percent,” wrote Lawton Mackall in his 1949 New York dining guide Knife and Fork in New York.

ChurchillsNYPL1914Fifteen percent 65 years ago was pretty good, considering that decades earlier, the question was whether to tip at all.

“In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, when the professional middle class, the public restaurant, and the tip were relatively new, the debate was not over how much to tip, but whether tipping itself was so destructive to democracy that it could not be allowed to continue,” wrote Andrew P. Halley in Turning the Tables.

Not everyone was on board with this practice imported from Europe—tipping was seen by some as “morally wrong.”

Tipexcerpt“When the waiter rushes forward to take your coat, hang it up, drag out your chair . . . when he flies to fulfill your order as if wings had been applied to his heels . . . for this wonderful galvanization of the waiter, what does it mean? Merely that he considers it probable, nay certain, that some of the silver change in your pocket will be transferred to his,” stated The New York Times in 1877.

Blossomrestaurantbereniceabbott1935

“By tipping him in this way you are corrupting his honesty, and harming his manliness, for he will be sure in the end to keep his good serving for those who pay, and turn a cold shoulder to the economical.”

Turn of the century labor leader Samuel Gompers came out against tipping any service worker. There was even talk of introducing no-tipping laws in the city, which had been passed in other jurisdictions.

3menwalkingpastlunchroomnyc

In 1907, a waiter wrote in to the Times to protest. “No doubt within a short time some of our politicians will introduce  an anti-tipping bill, as other states have done. . . .

Boweryrestaurantwalkerevans3334“An anti-tipping law would mean hardship and misery to the waiters, and it would be not long before they would organize and demand better pay and shorter hours, and the patrons would have to pay for it.”

Eventually, the anti-tipping laws were struck down before any were enacted in New York . . . and tipping servers working in one of the city’s almost 8,000 restaurants, whether a luxe establishment or lunch counter, became customary.

[Top photo: Delmonico's restaurant dinner for Admiral Dewey, 1906; Churchill's ad, NYPL; Blossom restaurant photo by Berenice Abbott, 1935; Three Men Walking Past Lunchroom, New York City, by Rudy Burckholdt, 1939; Walker Evans photo of Peoples Restaurant on the Bowery, 1933-1934]

An old Chinese restaurant sign return to view

February 24, 2014

Inexpensive Chinese restaurants have a long history in the city—chop suey was even invented in New York! Now, a previously hidden sign is back on display.

Chinesefoodfourthave

Hunan & Szechuan Cuisine, on Fourth Avenue and 13th Street, had been covered up by a different sign for Young Chow Restaurant—it’s now gone, the place shuttered one recent morning and sporting this (1980s?) signage.

The WWII servicemen’s hangout at Grand Central

February 20, 2014

ServicemensloungeWartime New York City was a very hospitable place for the thousands of enlisted men (and women) going off to fight in World War II or returning home on furlough.

Take Grand Central Terminal, for example. During the war, the East Balcony was turned into a “Service Men’s Lounge” by the New York Central and New Haven Railroads.

According to the back of this postcard, the lounge was “equipped with ping pong and pool tables, library, piano, easy chairs, lunch counter, etc.”

Servicemensloungepostcard

The lounge was “a meeting room for men of all nations,” wrote John Belle in Grand Central: Gateway to a Million Lives. “On any given day, it was not unusual to see a kilted Highlander at the coffee bar learning from an American soldier how to dunk a doughnut.”

In 1943, Life ran this warning about the lounge to travelers: “Busiest on weekends when thousands travel on furlough. To give them more room on weekend trains, plan trips you must make for mid-week.”

A surprising relic inside Bellevue Hospital’s lobby

February 17, 2014

In 2000, Bellevue Hospital Center—the city’s oldest hospital, established in 1794 in the hinterlands of the city along First Avenue and 28th Street—decided to build a new Ambulatory Care Pavilion.

Bellevuehospitalgate

The I.M. Pei-designed pavilion has been open since 2005. It’s a gleaming modern glass atrium, the kind seen on office buildings and institutions all over the city.

NYT2010060216222163CBut inside this atrium remains a curious piece of the hospital’s past.

The far wall of the atrium is actually the facade of an older Bellevue building.

It’s the granite and brick front of the 1930s administrative building built by McKim, Mead & White.

It’s nicely preserved and pretty impressive. Above what was the main hospital entrance facing First Avenue is a version of the official city seal.

Bellevuefacadelobby

Smaller entryways marked “waiting room” and “employes” also remain, as well as a gas lantern from the 1880s.

BellevuewaitingroomsignIt’s always inspiring to see an old facade spared the wrecking ball and incorporated into a new structure.

Check out a few recent examples: a church-turned-NYU-dorm and a condo springing up from inside the shell of an old elementary school.

Ephemeral New York is now on Twitter!

January 11, 2014

@EphemeralNY
Follow us . . . or stick with the old-school blog!
https://twitter.com/EphemeralNY

SanManRainyNight

First Tweet: Times Square in 1964, slick with rain and beautifully iridescent, from National Geographic (via a post on a new book about New York City trash collection in Collectors’ Weekly).

It feels appropriate for a cool, rainy January.

Addresses carved into Lower East Side corners

January 2, 2014

These old-school street name carvings pop up in the city’s tenement districts—and few neighborhoods have as high a concentration of tenements as the Lower East Side and East Village.

Avenuecaddresscarving

Avenue C above Houston Street was rebranded the East Village in the 1960s. But this red-brick residence with the graffiti tag on the upper left has the vibe of the LES.

Orchardhestercornersign

Above, turn-of-the-century Public School 42 notes its address: on the corner of Hester and Orchard Streets.

Interestingly, this is now known as the Benjamin Altman school, after the department store founder, the son of German immigrants who opened his first dry-goods store on nearby Attorney Street.

Divisonandpikesign

Division and Pike Streets are firmly in Lower East Side territory. Thanks to Ephemeral reader Iman for the great snap!

Old Times Square, blazing in color at night

December 16, 2013

There’s old Times Square—the 1960s and 1970s sleazy version. And then there’s the real old Times Square, in the early decades of the 20th century, when millions of lights illuminated the city’s primary entertainment district until dawn.

Timessquarerealold.jpg

Something about this stretch of New York at this time in history makes it seem exciting, passionate, alive. This Times Square feature streetcars, a Greyhound bus station, cigarette ads . . . and no public pedestrian plaza.

A scolding old-school subway sign at 34th Street

December 14, 2013

How many generations of rushed subway riders have been greeted by this scolding vintage wood sign, at the entrance to the Herald Square station on Sixth Avenue and 34th Street?

Sixthavenuesubwaysignold

It’s been forgotten by the MTA apparently; they’ve long since replaced most subway signs with uniform black signs.

Makes you think you’re back in grade school, no?


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