Posts Tagged ‘Brooklyn at the turn of the century’

Where Brooklyn residents bought Christmas cards

November 28, 2013

Bought your holiday cards yet? This vintage Brooklyn business card is your reminder.

Sending Christmas greeting cards was apparently enough of a tradition in Brooklyn by the turn of the last century that stationery stores put them at the top of their list of amenities on business cards.

Christmascardbrooklyn

I wonder what “fringed” cards looked like. Too bad the S.H. Palmer & Company stationery store can’t tell us, because they’ve long closed up shop. The last address at 481 Fulton was a cell phone store.

This card is part of the wonderful Fulton Street Trade Card Collection at the Brooklyn Public Library.

An early view of Victorian Flatbush

August 26, 2010

These gorgeous homes are just as lovely today as they were in 1901, the year stamped on the back of this postcard.

That’s right about when Flatbush was colonized into middle-class neighborhoods of single-family houses.

“No section of Brooklyn has witnessed a more attractive and satisfactory development than the Flatbush section,” reports a New York Times article from 1910, kind of an early “If You’re Thinking of Living in” piece.

“Enjoying good transit facilities, with pleasant surroundings and admirably situated lots, it is not surprising that thousands of residents who wish to be close to the centres of the city’s commercial industries and yet possess the advantages of pleasant suburban homes have chosen Flatbush as a home site.”

I wish I could make out the handwriting at the top left. It looks like “565 East 31st Street.” It must be the address of the sender rather than the cross street in the postcard, since East 31st Street doesn’t cross Ocean Avenue. 

19th century business cards for long-gone shops

August 24, 2010

I wonder what it was like to be a kid living near Frank J. Barker’s Confectionery 100 years ago, about when this card was printed. Just imagine that wonderful fresh baked bread smell and store counters teeming with cakes and pies.

And Charlotte Russes. Old-time New Yorkers still rave about this sweet treat.

327 Fifth Avenue—South Brooklyn until about 30 years ago, Park Slope now—currently houses a wine shop.

Madame Robson’s millinery goods must have been popular. She had two Brooklyn locations.