Posts Tagged ‘brooklyn high schools’

Girls’ High School is a Gothic dream in Bed-Stuy

March 26, 2018

“It is the ambition of every Brooklyn girl after graduating from the public schools to enter the Girls’ High School, where she may enjoy the advantages of advanced education, and be prepared for college or for more immediate concerns of life.”

That was the lead in a New York Times story about Girls’ High in 1895, when Brooklyn was a separate city known for its strong support of public schools.

The postcard at the top of the page gives us Girls’ High as a Victorian Gothic dream building, opened in 1886 at Nostrand Avenue and Halsey Street.

So proud of the school was the newly unified city that they put it on a postcard.

Today the combined Boys and Girls High School is on Fulton Street, and the old Girls’ building is an adult learning center.

[First image: NYPL; second image: 6tocelebrate.org]

Defunct Bushwick High’s glorious school song

June 22, 2011

Bushwick High School, opened in 1914, had a rough final decade or two before the school graduated its last class in 2006.

In the 1990s, a student was raped in the basement. The student body was twice as large as the building could hold. The graduation rate stalled at 35 percent.

With this in mind, it’s hard to imagine a time when Bushwick High was an athletic powerhouse and students swelled with pride.

But if the school song is to be believed, they were—about 100 years ago.

A sampling of the lyrics:

“Oh! See the flashing colors of dear old Bushwick High;
And hear her sons and daughters throw out the gladsome cry;
Dear Bushwick now and ever, in vict’ry or defeat;
On diamond, track, and field, old Bushwick’s athletes can’t be beat.”

The star athletes of Brooklyn’s Boys High School

August 20, 2010

Class of January 1934, that is—back then, when Boys High in Bed-Stuy was a top high school, graduations took place in January and June.

If these kids were 18 in 1934, they’d be 94 now. They got their diplomas during the Depression and were young enough to serve in World War II.

We don’t know what their lives were like. But the Boys High yearbook, where this photo comes from, reveals a bit about their personalities and plans. 

Isidore Friedenthal was voted Best All-Around Man and Best Athlete. Sidney Firestone snagged Best Speaker and Class Salutorian. 

Thomas Walsh was Most Popular and headed to Holy Cross for engineering school. Enoch Stolder got into Syracuse dental. And August Bartoli was planning on “New York University School of Commerce.”