Posts Tagged ‘Brooklyn in 1900’

Where Brooklyn residents bought Christmas cards

November 28, 2013

Bought your holiday cards yet? This vintage Brooklyn business card is your reminder.

Sending Christmas greeting cards was apparently enough of a tradition in Brooklyn by the turn of the last century that stationery stores put them at the top of their list of amenities on business cards.

Christmascardbrooklyn

I wonder what “fringed” cards looked like. Too bad the S.H. Palmer & Company stationery store can’t tell us, because they’ve long closed up shop. The last address at 481 Fulton was a cell phone store.

This card is part of the wonderful Fulton Street Trade Card Collection at the Brooklyn Public Library.

What’s on the menu at the Brighton Beach Hotel?

September 6, 2012

At the turn of the last century, the sprawling Brighton Beach Hotel served as a more upscale seaside resort than its neighbor, Coney Island.

And if you were wrapping up your summer vacation there in 1906, you’d probably make dinner plans at the hotel restaurant.

So what kind of food and drink would be available to you?

We’re talking about a mind-boggling array of seafood (clear green turtle soup! fried eels!), poultry, caviar, steak, chops, pastries, and ice cream, not to mention a pretty big wine and drink list.

The entire hotel restaurant menu from that year (the front cover is at left) has been preserved as part of the New York Public Library’s menu collection.

It’s a fantastic reference that gives us a peek at the city’s culinary preferences over the years.

The massive menu selection can be viewed here. But for just the seafood, check out this excerpt from it above. I wonder what exactly was in clam chowder Brighton?

A 1906 postcard of the lovely and genteel Brighton Beach Hotel, once at the foot of Coney Island Avenue. Thanks to Kevin P. for suggesting this menu.

The beginning of Brooklyn’s Eastern Parkway

November 17, 2011

A century ago, the majestic trees lining the pedestrian malls along lovely Eastern Parkway, seen here where it starts at Prospect Park (illuminated by what looks like one lone street light!), were not much more than saplings.

The handsome apartment houses flanking Eastern Parkway, which gave the boulevard the long-ago nickname Doctors’ Row, have yet to be constructed.

And that tower on the right? It’s the water tower built at Prospect Park, opened in 1893 at the northeast corner of Eastern Parkway and Flatbush Avenue.

The oldest street sign in Brooklyn

June 6, 2011

Maybe it is—it’s hard to tell how long ago this rusted old sign at the corner of Marlborough and Albemarle Roads went up.

And since it’s located in Prospect Park South, a planned suburban community developed around 1900, it may not be an official city street sign but a decorative one meant to mark the beginning of the neighborhood.

Hidden among the thick leaves of a tree and behind contemporary street signs attached to a Bishop’s Crook lamppost, the Marlborough Road sign has probably seen many decades of Victorian Flatbush history.

Here’s another old-school Brooklyn Street sign still standing tall in Fort Greene as of 2009.