Posts Tagged ‘Edward Steichen’

The blue glow of the Flatiron Building at twilight

October 22, 2018

When the Flatiron Building opened in 1902, this graceful steel-frame skyscraper was a symbol of 20th century urban power and progress.

Two years later, pioneering photographer Edward Steichen created this photo of the Flatiron. He gave the image a blue glow during printing to make it evocative of twilight. And with the tree branches and puddles of rain in the foreground, he juxtaposed the made-made tower with powerful elements of the natural world.

“Steichen may have been drawing on his knowledge of Japanese prints, in which similar natural and built features exist harmoniously,” states this Middlebury College Museum of Art page. Japanese woodblock prints were all the rage at the time.

[Photo: Metmuseum]

The elegant artist studios overlooking Bryant Park

January 9, 2014

Artists have always had a tough time finding bright, generous, inexpensive studio and exhibition space in New York.

Bryantparkstudiobuilding2013So in the flourishing city of the late 19th century—with the population bursting and Manhattan filling up in every direction—studio buildings that were specifically designed for artists began appearing.

One 12-story studio building constructed in 1900-1901 still stands on Sixth Avenue and 40th Street, at the southwest corner of the recently renamed Bryant Park (until the 1880s, it had been known as Reservoir Square).

The Bryant Park Studios Building is a lovely structure where Edward Steichen, Fernand Leger, Irving Penn, and other painters and sculptors took advantage of double-height windows and northern light.

BryantparkstudiobuildingearlyToday, it’s hard to imagine traffic-choked midtown Manhattan as an artists’ neighborhood.

But the light a century ago was uninterrupted, and new studio buildings had also gone up on West 57th Street—making it an “artistic center,” notes this 1988 Neighborhood Preservation Center report.

Who had the money to fund such a lovely building? A Paris-trained American artist named A.A. Anderson, who had married into wealth. He explained why he constructed the studio building in his autobiography, excerpted in the NPC report:

“My business friends said it was a foolish thing to erect so expensive a studio building in what was then the ‘Tenderloin District,'” he wrote.

Bryantparkstudiobuilding70s“‘But I wanted the best, since it is usually the best or the poorest who pays.'”

By the middle of the 20th century, the building was repurposed for fashion industry showrooms, though one artist hung on to space she had first occupied decades earlier and had it at least into the 1990s.

[Middle photo: an early photo of the building, with nothing in its way and the gritty Sixth Avenue El on the right.]

[Bottom photo: It looks like this was taken in the 1970s; the Bryant Park Studio Building is still lovely, but boxed in from the side and behind.]

The tortoise and the hares on Park Avenue

March 31, 2010

1040 Park Avenue, at 86th Street, is a stately Upper East Side co-op. It doesn’t crack a smile—except when it comes to the tortoise and hare friezes that wrap around the third floor facade.

The penthouse was the longtime home of magazine publisher Conde Nast, who invited guests such as George Gershwin, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and Edward Steichen for a housewarming party in 1925, a year after the building opened.

Twilight falls over the Flatiron

October 31, 2008

Luxembourg-born American artist Edward Steichen added color to his 1904 photograph of the Flatiron Building, casting it in a moody, blueish glow.   

Completed in 1902, the Flatiron Building is considered one of New York’s first skyscrapers . . . even though it’s only 22 stories high.