Posts Tagged ‘Yellow Hook’

The Hooks of Upper Manhattan

August 8, 2010

Downtown has Corlears Hook. Brooklyn has Red Hook (and once had Yellow Hook). 

Upper Manhattan also had some Hooks—like Tubby Hook, sometimes called Tubby’s Hook. It was the 18th and 19th century name for a section of Inwood between Fort Tryon Park and Inwood Hill Park.

An 1894 New York Times article describes it like this:

[“View, Tubby Hook and Spuyten Duyvel Creek,” from the NYPL in the 1860s or 1870s]

“A little below Riverdale, at a point near Inwood, there is a projection known as Tubby’s Hook, where the water is deep enough to allow large steamers to pass quite close to it. Tubby’s Hook is also a resort for fishermen.”

It’s a funny name that’s probably a bastardization of the last name of Peter Ubrecht, a wealthy 18th century resident.

Jeffrey’s Hook is another precipice jutting into the Hudson. It’s under the George Washington Bridge and now known as the location of the Little Red Lighthouse, Manhattan’s only lighthouse.

But Jeffrey’s Hook played a big role in colonial history: It’s where Washington and his troops traveled back and forth to Fort Lee during the Revolutionary War.

Taking a joy ride along the river in Bay Ridge

September 14, 2008

The back of this 1906 postcard states that the view “looks north from 85th Street.” The riders in that vehicle must have endured some rough bumps along the road. 

I wish the postcard identified the structure with the lovely porch and turrets. In the distance you can see, faintly, the Statue of Liberty.

Bay Ridge got its name from the glacial ridge beneath it that provides high, sloping views of the water. Originally called Yellow Hook after its yellowish sand, this village in the town of Nieuw Utrecht was renamed following a yellow-fever epidemic that ravaged the area in the 1840s.